iOS tutorials for beginners and experienced developers

Here you can find iPhone tutorials for beginners or experienced developers. You can find also web design tutorials or web development tutorials. If you want to receive the latest articles and tutorials about the iOS world or the latest trends in web design, Just subscribe to our newsletter.

IMG_0743-0.JPG

MoneyCoach updated to 1.2

IMG_0743.JPG

We released a big update for MoneyCoach that include several bug fixes and some new features:

– Better support for TouchID
– Transactions are grouped by date now
– Identify transfers better
– Added validation rules for transfers
– See transactions for every account
– Fixed small bug with pageControl
– Fixed a bug when displaying the Transaction by Category report
– Fixed a bug when setting a transaction as recurring

If you haven’t update it yet, then please go on Appstore and get the latest version.

You will thank us.

MoneyCoach

It is with immense joy that we released MoneyCoach over one week ago.
Since then we received some valued feedback and the app has been doing great so far.

We are constantly improving the app and fixing some stupid bugs.

If you want to contribute or have something to report, please write at support@duuro.com. We will be happy to assist you.

parse+swift header

Integrate Parse in Swift

On my last project, MoneyCoach, I had to integrate Parse in Swift. And after searching a lot and trying different solutions on StackOverflow, I decided to be a good citizen and save you guys a lot of time.

I will also cover in the next part to support iOS 7, because in iOS 7 the app crashes if you use the boilerplate code from Parse.

Of course this tutorial is focused only for the iOS users.

Continue Reading…

iOS 8 Localization – Updating Storyboard and Xib Strings Files Using ibtool

This is a quick snippet on how to update your storyboard translation file, after you change your main Storyboard, for example, if you add or remove some new UILabels, etc.
I thought it would be kind of handy to have it here, rather than going through all the Apple Documentation. Enjoy
When you change user-facing text in .storyboard or .xib files, use the ibtool command to generate new strings files. Use another tool—for example, FileMerge—to identify the changes and merge them into the existing strings files for each language you support. Xcode doesn’t automatically update the corresponding strings files when you edit a .storyboard or .xib file.In Terminal, change to the Base.lproj folder, and run this command to generate a strings file for an xib file:

  • ibtool [MyNib].xib --generate-strings-file [MyNib_new.strings]

Optionally, localize the changes in the output file before merging the changes with the [MyNib].strings file in each lproj folder. To launch FileMerge from Xcode, choose Xcode > Open Developer Tool > FileMerge.

Alternatively, you can use the ibtool command to merge translations back into a nib file and perform other incremental localization updates, as described in the ibtool man page. Or use the appleglot command to manage changes to the strings files, as described in Localizing Text Using AppleGlot.

Screenshot 2014-11-02 10.21.07

Why your inbox is broken and nobody can fix it

When it comes to technologies and other cool stuff that promises new habits and life changing experiences, I like to call myself an early adopter.

The last 10 days or so, the email was the buzz them, and this because of an awesome service (and app) released by Google. Probably you know I am talking about Inbox by Google.
I jumped in to the beta programme and I have been searching, reading and playing with it. Continue Reading…

Core Data NSExpression Count Date

This is a short code that will get you the count of your entities in a Core Data based app.
The most important part is the NSExpressionDescription definition and NSExpression definition.

After searching and scratching my head a lot, I thought to save you some time by showing this piece of gist (not done by me). So thanks to Pete Aykroyd.

Improvements are always welcomed.

Social Media and Smartphone Facts: Review of Why Men Look For Business & Love While Women Seek Games & Knowledge

Social media and mobile use give us a treasure hoard of insights about our general habits as a community. So it’s only inevitable that we find numerous surveys about the two platforms based on one of the most popular categories: gender difference. These converging platforms are considered to be one of the biggest disruptive trends, as trivial as changing society’s shopping habits and critical as changing government through popular revolutions. And as in real life, men and women differ in using social media and their mobile devices.

We’re already familiar with the disparity in words used by both sexes. We have a comprehensive collation of words used by men and women in their social networks, which, interestingly, showcases the f-word as one of the favorites in men’s comments and posts.

Likewise, we’ve shown before in our previous infographic how women dominate men in social media; this time, we want to dig deeper using the recent studies on social media and mobile use by Pew and Nielsen, among others.

Apparently, the gender difference revolves around three distinct areas: our personal and professional relationships, the need for information and entertainment, and consumer behavior. On that note, we prepared this infographic based on those parameters for a broader look at how men and women differ. There are distinct variances. For instance, men are more likely to use social media for business and dating, while women for relationships, sharing, entertainment, and self-help.

Surprisingly, women ignore paid advertising more often than men. This makes sense because women in general are more conscious of their social circle and ads are intrusive strangers. Moreover, women seem to use their smartphones in more ways than men.  Here’s a mini-shocker: women play games in their smartphones 10% more often than men. In fact, women dominate men in almost all the top smartphone activities, such as, visit websites, download apps (surprise!), messaging, text, and camera use.

TWEETABLE FACTS:

  • 38% of women play games on their smartphones and they outnumber men by 10%! [Tweet This]
  • 13% of men use social media for dating in comparison to only 7% of women. [Tweet This]
  • 71% of women on Facebook are willing to ‘like’ a brand for deals. Only 18% of men do that. [Tweet This]

CHECK OUT THIS INFOGRAPHIC AND SEE HOW MEN & WOMEN DIFFER ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

social media analysis

Retaining Information as Professionals

It’s no secret that technology is changing the way we do business. Large companies like Apple and Google are continually introducing new technology that impacts multiple industries and countless professionals. As these specific changes continue to shape our professional lives, a consistent desire to learn is required. So, for example, those in the digital marketing industry may want to know when Google makes changes to its search algorithm. Products and services are consistently being unveiled, accompanied by terms such as “game changing” and “groundbreaking.”

Apple-Google

With so many industries experiencing constant changes, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the new information. So what do we do? We read and study, learning what we can so we can be the best in our business. But making material stick in our minds can be tricky. That’s why to retain what we’ve learned, we often need to contemplate it—a practice that is often ignored by professionals.

To contemplate something is to mentally repeat it over and over again. And by circling back to what we’ve just heard or read, we’re helping to retain the information.

Here are some ways you can ensure you’re retaining information:

1. Reflect on what you’ve just read or heard.
Don’t rush to the next article, podcast, or book. Just pause for a few moments. Review the material in your mind as often as you need to (or are able to), while ensuring you understand the information.You may need to go back and reread or listen to something again, but taking the time to do so now could save you time in the future.

2. Write about the information.
By writing about the information you’re wanting to retain, you are often forced to explain the material, which can lead to greater retention. Many people blog when practicing this point, but even if you don’t have a blog, you might consider creating a new document on your computer (or adding a new note on your mobile device) and writing some of the learned information there. You could even write it down on your mobile device. According to Verizon Wireless, “The latest smartphones and top tablets feature a wide variety of apps for writers on the go.” One app in particular is Write or Die, which lets you set a goal regarding a specific word count and punishes if you don’t reach it. Writing about the information you’ve learned will allow you to use it in the future and serve as a refresher. Also, don’t forget that you can certainly use the classic instruments of pen and paper to accomplish your task.

3. Post bits about what you’re learning on social media.
Write down a few words about what you’ve learned and post it to Twitter. Put a link to a post you found interesting on your Facebook page. You’ll want to be careful if you’re doing this in an office setting where social media sites are prohibited, but if you’re able to practice this, it may be worth your while. Doing so will not only allow you to reference the information later, but it may invite others to learn alongside you, thus giving you the opportunity to talk about what you’ve read, which brings us to the final point.

4. Talk about it.
Engage your colleagues on what you’re learning. Doing so will help you retain the information by repeating it to someone else, and perhaps you’ll get input from them that you’d never considered before on the subject.

Retaining information is often neither quick nor easy, but as business continues to be shaped by the fast-moving world around us, perhaps pausing long enough to consider what we’ve read or heard will better equip us to use the information in the future. This will not be necessary for all topics, but certain pieces of information will most certainly be worth keeping in mind.